Safety

A Commitment to a Safe Industry

The Aluminum Association, and the aluminum industry, has long made the safety and well-being of its employees a top priority.

Injury and illness data gathered by the Aluminum Association indicate that aluminum plants are a relatively safe place to work. Millions of pounds of aluminum are melted and cast safely everyday in casthouses, foundries, recycling and reclamation plants all over the world. However, just like any manufacturing process, there are inherent risks and hazards involved with the production and fabrication of our metal.

The Aluminum Association believes that these hazards can be minimized or eliminated entirely by careful attention to safe handling practices and the sharing of best practices. To that end, the Association’s safety programs include:

  • The development and distribution of publications on the safe production and handling of aluminum
  • Biannual Casthouse Safety Workshops to educate plant workers and managers on workplace safety
  • The release of an annual molten metal incident report to share information regarding explosion and related events at facilities that melt aluminum
  • Ongoing testing and reporting with member companies for continued safety improvements

Below is some general information on the aluminum industry safety as well as relevant technical material. Please contact Association Vice President for Policy Charles Johnson with any specific questions.

Molten Aluminum
Failure to use proper procedures in melting and casting aluminum can be dangerous. Molten Aluminum is typically handled at 1300-1450 degrees Fahrenheit to avoid premature solidification. Contact with molten aluminum can cause severe burns and create a serious fire hazard. Mixing water or other contaminants with molten aluminum can cause explosions. Explosions can also occur in the aluminum scrap re-melting process due to moisture and contamination in scrap.

These explosions range widely in violence and can result in injury or death as well as destruction of equipment and plant facilities. Where there is possibility of splash or other direct exposure, personnel working with molten aluminum must wear eye and face protection as well as protective clothing.

The Aluminum Association releases an annual molten metal incident report to report information regarding hazardous events that occur at facilities melting aluminum. The report is the product of a voluntary program started in 1985 to share safety information among facilities. Although not intended to be statistically representative of the entire industry, the report provides useful information to help guide safety efforts in molten aluminum environments. The latest Molten Metal Incident Report is below.

Aluminum Sow Casting and Charging
Bulk aluminum intended for re-melting is often cast in the form of large shapes, weighing 700 to 2000 pounds, commonly known as sows. The sow-casting process generally results in unavoidable internal shrinkage cavities, which can become reservoirs for collecting large amounts of water. Sows are also subject to surface moisture and other contaminants. This contamination can result in dangerous explosions during the re-melt process.  Therefore, operators must make every effort to avoid charging sows that contain moisture, either entrapped or on the surface, into molten aluminum.

The Aluminum Association discourages the practice of drying sows by placing them on furnace sills containing molten aluminum. Explosions may occur from sows slipping into the molten baths before fully dry or from water condensing between stacks of sows.

Aluminum Fines & Powder
Activities including the grinding, polishing, sawing, cutting, sanding and scratch brushing of aluminum generate fine aluminum particles, some of which are potentially explosive. These particles are known as “fines”, “dust” or “powder.”

In the case of aluminum, explosions can result if ignition occurs while particles are suspended in the air as a dust cloud, as the burning extends from one particle to another with extreme speed. Potential sources of ignition include open flames, welding equipment, cutting torches, matches, cigarettes, faulty electrical equipment and static electrical charges.

Qualified personnel can determine the degree of hazard in any operation through laboratory testing. Dust collections systems, of the dry or the wet type, safely capture potentially explosive aluminum fines. Enclosures or exhaust hoods provide efficient pick-up of the fines from the machine or equipment. 

Below are several resources on the safe handling of aluminum fines and powder.  

Alloy Combustibility
To develop information on the combustibility and flammability of aluminum alloys, the Aluminum Association commissioned testing in accordance with the ASTME 136-11 "Standard Test Method for Behavior of Materials in a Vertical Tube Furnace at 750°C" on common alloys 3003, 5052, 5083 and 6061. The testing indicated that all four alloys met the performance criteria presented in ASTM E 136-11. Links to the individual test reports are provided below.

The aluminum industry directly employs more than 155,000 workers.

More than 155,000 workers are directly employed in the aluminum industry. For each aluminum industry job, an additional 3.3 employment positions are created elsewhere in the economy. In total, 672,000 U.S. jobs are created by the production, processing and use of aluminum.

News

July 31, 2014
Addition of Associate Member Companies Highlights Continued Growth for the Industry, Association
June 10, 2014
Explosive Growth Expected for Aluminum-Bodied Cars and Trucks; Reaching 18 Percent Within a Decade