Aluminum Built a Museum

Colonel Scott Willey of the Air and Space museum, who gave a private tour to the Association’s Technical Committee on Product Standards, said “Without aluminum, we wouldn’t have a museum.” From the top of the Donald D. Engen Observation Tower at the Udvar-Hazy Center –part of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum - visitors have a 360-degree bird's-eye view of Washington Dulles International Airport.  It’s a place to view aluminum in action: making human flight possible. 

Aluminum Goes to Mars

“NASA could not have made it to the surface of Mars without aluminum.” So says Dr. John Grotzinger Chief Scientist and Head of Strategic Planning for the 2012 Mars Rover Mission. Grotzinger led NASA’s $2.5 billion Curiosity rover mission – perhaps the most visible mission in the history of robotic space exploration in its search for evidence of past life on the surface of the red planet.

Aluminum Has Been Go-To Aerospace Material for More Than 100 Years and New Innovations Keep It the Material of Choice

ARLINGTON, VA.
In a recent release from the Office of Washington Lieutenant Governor, Brad Owens, James Palmer, an economic development manager of the Washington State Department of Commerce is quoted as saying, "Think of composites as the new aluminum."

Constellium Joins the Aluminum Association

ARLINGTON, Va., The Aluminum Association is pleased to announce the addition of our newest member, Constellium, to the Association’s ever-growing efforts to best represent the aluminum industry and its suppliers as the most sustainable and recyclable material option for key sectors of the American and global economy.

Aircraft & Aerospace

Quick Read

The advancement of aircraft and rocket technology is directly tied to the advancement and production of aluminum alloys. From the Wright brothers’ use of aluminum in the engine of their first biplane to NASA’s use of an aluminum-lithium alloy in the new Orion spacecraft—aluminum has created the potential for mankind to fly both around the Earth and into space.